Members | Sign In
Old CGS Forum > Upgrades & Parts
avatar

scale length

posted Sep 22, 2014 08:19:33 by Jason
can someone tell how to the scale length. I know you measure from nut to 12th fret and then double it. My PRS Custom 24 is 25" scale length.

What i want to know is where does the bridge sit.

I have attached a pic with 3 numbers. Which number determines the bridge position to relation to the end of the scale length.

1. the start of the base of the bridge
2. where the saddles starts ( how do you determine when the saddle dont sit at the same distance)
3. at the end of the saddle.

Thanks. I hope this makes sense.

The reason i ask is that the low E string intonation is out by almote 1/2 a step sharp. No matter how much i adjust the saddle. A pro tech reckons the bridge might not be in the correct position(I changed the original for a new one).

[Last edited Sep 22, 2014 09:01:10]
page   1
8 replies
avatar
Jason said Sep 22, 2014 09:03:15

avatar
HtesJoseph said Sep 22, 2014 09:30:03
I thinks you start with the center of the highest e saddle
My band page on Facebook, The Damn Hippies. Like it if you like it. (*};=/ https://www.facebook.com/TheDamnHippies
avatar
ChibsonsandMore said Sep 22, 2014 12:14:10
If it is one string, I'd be willing to bet it's the nut slot. It is probably too high or shallow and needs to be deepened.
avatar
MichaelWamback said Sep 24, 2014 20:02:04
Definitely possible that the string isn't resting properly in the saddle, but also possible that the bridge isn't in the correct position. You should still notice a change when adjusting for intonation though.

You said you had replaced the bridge. Were you able to set the intonation correctly on the original bridge?
The two most important things to remember in life: "The only time it's acceptable to work with amateurs is if you are making porn." "If you want to work with clowns, join a circus."
avatar
ChibsonsandMore said Sep 24, 2014 22:38:39
In my limited experience with extremely out of whack slots on a nut, I was never able to get the bridge saddle to intonate. It was like no matter which direction I would go, it didn't even change the fretted note by a cent when actually tuned up to pitch.

The bridge itself effectively counters what sort of issue you might have with the nut. With bridges that are fully adjustable on each string saddle, the nut can almost be in a range of a couple of millimeters without causing issues. But if it's too high it's going to throw EVERYTHING out of whack.
avatar
Jason said Sep 24, 2014 23:38:52

You said you had replaced the bridge. Were you able to set the intonation correctly on the original bridge?


Yes it was. But the screw hole on the new bridge didnt line up with the existing ones. So I may have installed it slightly out of alignment.

I might just the guitar tech to have a look at it and see if it can be fixed by adjusting the nut rather than the bridge.

avatar
MichaelWamback said Sep 25, 2014 15:35:03
Sounds like a good place to start. If the holes didn't line up, it's possible that the bridge is a bit too far forward. Perhaps it can be shimmed, or you may have to fill the holes with dowel and drill new holes. What was wrong with the original bridge?
The two most important things to remember in life: "The only time it's acceptable to work with amateurs is if you are making porn." "If you want to work with clowns, join a circus."
avatar
Jason said Sep 26, 2014 03:09:04
I cant stand wind-in tremolo arms. So i replace it with a wilkinson push-in version.

It is much better as i can set the tension with the allen key.

When i get some time I might just pull it off and fill the holes and try redrilling.
I dont play that guitar much anymore. Lost interest since the tuning issues.
Login below to reply: