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Pickup Resistance- Measuring while installed?

posted Jul 09, 2014 17:11:59 by stanton.kramer
I've mentioned my new Gibson in other threads. When changing strings I foolishly failed to pull the pickups out to see what they were. Gibson tells me they are Burstbucker pros. I don't know. I'll look next time. But I would like to measure the resistance.

Am I able to get an accurate measurement thru the rear cavity without pulling out the pups? If so, where to I place the terminal probes from my multi meter? Michael... I'm sure you have an answer.
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3 replies
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MichaelWamback said Jul 09, 2014 18:26:18
Not really an electronics genius - but my understanding is that you would have to isolate the pickup to measure it properly with your meter. Basically, you should be able to unsolder the hot wire from the pot and then measure the pickup's resistance by touching one probe to the back of the pot (ground circuit) and the other to the hot wire of the pickup.

But my understanding is you can't accurately measure it once you wire it to the pot.

But I'm happy to stand corrected if some of you know much better than I do. :)

The two most important things to remember in life: "The only time it's acceptable to work with amateurs is if you are making porn." "If you want to work with clowns, join a circus."
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MichaelWamback said Jul 09, 2014 18:33:21
Here's something clever you can play with though. Plug a chord into the guitar and touch the prongs of the meter to the 2 different parts of the chord plug (the tip is hot, the shaft is ground). With your pots turned all the way up - you should be able to measure the actual output of the guitar without opening the back. My SG has pretty hot pickups - the bridge measured 17k and the neck about 8.7k - which is about what I would expect them to be.

It's also a great way to check if pots are working properly before you open the guitars as well. As you turn down the volume, your value should change.
The two most important things to remember in life: "The only time it's acceptable to work with amateurs is if you are making porn." "If you want to work with clowns, join a circus."
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Buddhapickups said Jul 10, 2014 04:48:05
yep, what mike just said should give you a rough idea of the output. The output measured that way with the cable in the jack, using your probes from your multimeter on the sleeve and the tip will generally be a lil lower than what your output actually is, but, the difference is very nominal.
This way is the easiest without having to open up your guitar.
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