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Bridge change

posted Jan 15, 2014 12:39:48 by SteveTebble
Just this which looks interesting:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VkPTe7JP9RA

Does anyone have any idea which bridge you'd need to buy to achieve this?

Would it be this one?

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Gibson-Nashville-Tune-o-matic-Bridge-Chrome-Guitar-Parts-ES-Les-Paul-CS-SG-V-Exp-/380813757973?pt=Guitar_Accessories&hash=item58aa44ce15

Or would this one do?

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Pinnacle-Tune-o-Matic-Nashville-bridge-Chrome-fits-USA-Gibson-guitars-/111095625254?pt=Guitar_Accessories&hash=item19ddd0b626
[Last edited Jan 15, 2014 12:43:05]
God give me patience ... but I want it NOW!!
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23 replies
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VinceRadice said Jan 15, 2014 13:03:32
That is the bridge you would need, BUT it won't fit into the threaded plugs currently in your guitars body, the thread in std Chibson plugs is usually 8mm (Diameter) x 1.25mm (Pitch). BUT sometimes the Bridge plugs are 6mm x 1.0mm. neither of which will accept the std Gibson Posts, which are 5mm x 0.8mm. The body plugs supplied with most Nashville tuneomatic bridges are too small for the holes that are in the chibson body after the 8mm plugs have been removed. what you need is a "conversion plug" with a 5mm thread and a outside diameter large enough for the chibson body. And I have no idea where you would get one (StewMac?)I hope this helps.
[Last edited Jan 15, 2014 13:09:27]
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SteveTebble said Jan 15, 2014 13:25:32
What the video suggested was NOT to remove the Chibson plugs, just to file the splines off the Gibson ones so that they dropped in.
God give me patience ... but I want it NOW!!
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VinceRadice said Jan 15, 2014 13:28:09
A dodgey mod at best, in Michaels thread he refers to a Faber bridge conversion kit LINK
[Last edited Jan 15, 2014 13:28:32]
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VinceRadice said Jan 15, 2014 13:30:42
If you do what he says in the YT vid, you could easily run out of adjustment when trying to lower your bridge, if you like your action low.
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vambostrausser said Jan 15, 2014 13:43:08
Checkout

http://www.philadelphialuthiertools.com/

They carry metric sizes studs with small posts,they can be seen here in link below

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_e2qWiMEpqg
THE CUSTOMER IS ALWAYS RIGHT,THE GIRL IS MUCH TOO YOUNG TO KNOW THE DIFFERENCE
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VinceRadice said Jan 15, 2014 14:08:35
also the Faber BSWKIT is available on ebay
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SteveTebble said Jan 15, 2014 14:36:12
I wonder if it would be better to just buy a decent bridge and send it over to be installed.
God give me patience ... but I want it NOW!!
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VinceRadice said Jan 15, 2014 14:51:32
the conversion kit is only $26+postage, But obviously it would be easier if the bridge was fitted at the factory, Has anyone tried sending parts to be fitted to a guitar build yet??
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SteveTebble said Jan 15, 2014 15:07:15
Actually I'm considering ordering a 335 but I want it with a trapeze tailpiece rather than a stoptail. Now somewhere in my loft I have a trapeze tailpiece from an Epiphone Casino, which I removed to have a Bigsby fitted. Have already messaged the shop (Guitar Wholesale Shops) and they confirm it is fine for customers to send their own parts for fitting.

So probably quite a few suppliers would be happy to do that. Might also work for tuners, pickups, switches, pots ... !
God give me patience ... but I want it NOW!!
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MichaelWamback said Jan 15, 2014 16:35:24
If you want to convert from an Asian bridge to a Gibson spec, the Faber kits are a good option. I would definitely recommend that over trying to file down the posts on the Asian studs.

Faber has 2 different kits - one with a solid bushing that you can use by pulling the old bushings and then pushing in the Faber ones, and a 2nd conversion that has posts with Asian thread on the bottom half and Gibson ABR-1 thread on the top half. Either would work fine. In theory, you may bet a bit more sustain with the solid posts, but if you are nervous about pulling the bushings than the 2nd option is pretty low-tech that anyone can do.

If you do want pull the bushings and you haven't done it before - it's pretty easy. Find a bolt that is small enough to fit into the bushings once you've unscrewed the post. Cut a small piece of the bolt off, so that you can drop it into the hole and then screw the original post back in on top of it. As you tighten the post in the bushing, the small piece of metal will push against the wood at the bottom of the guitar. Since the post can't move down, it will pull the bushing up as you tighten it.

The Faber kit has an ABR-1 thread which might be a hair smaller than the modern Gibson Nashville thread. I don't think it's enough difference to cause a problem though.

This is also a good chance to remind everyone that if you ever get a Chibson with the bridge placement slightly off (which could happen) so you just can't get your bridge to intonate correctly (due to running out of room to move the saddle) all is not lost. Brown's Guitar Factory makes a conversion post that has the small threaded shaft offset. This will actually allow you to shift the position of the bridge just a small bit without the need to fill and redrill the post holes.

The two most important things to remember in life: "The only time it's acceptable to work with amateurs is if you are making porn." "If you want to work with clowns, join a circus."
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stanton.kramer said Jan 16, 2014 16:21:46
I wanted to do a bridge conversion as mentioned above but found that parts were just not available that were within my comfort zone. I did however change to a Wilkinson roller bridge (pictured below). I've done a quick vid with my iPhone showing the sustain on open chords with the Wilkinson.

The Wilkinson is *more or less* a drop in as it comes with the metric 8 x 1.25mm thread posts, HOWEVER the holes did need a *tad* of widening (the post width was too narrow) to make it fit without other modifications to the guitar. Not quite sure why the post holes didn't line up exactly with the posts. I did the hole enlargement with a dremel tool, in excruciatingly small increments until it fit properly. If I had a drill press it would have been faster and easier. The hole enlargement did nothing for the contact points as this bridge is fastened directly to the posts with allen screws, two on each post which also allows for "canting" of the bridge.

See the video to show the sustain with this bridge



[Last edited Jan 16, 2014 16:27:52]
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SteveTebble said Jan 16, 2014 16:48:56
Interesting!

I'm beginning to think though, that the solution to this problem is to just send your selected bridge to the seller so that they can fit that instead of theirs. All the stores I've asked so far have said they can do that.
God give me patience ... but I want it NOW!!
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stanton.kramer said Jan 16, 2014 17:05:38
I'm beginning to think though, that the solution to this problem is to just send your selected bridge to the seller so that they can fit that instead of theirs.


Though I'm not 100% certain, it is MUCH more expensive to ship stuff from the US than they are charging in China to send stuff to us. I used to live in Mexico and to ship a *small* box USPS to MEX was $40. Also, who knows how stuff is handled once it gets over there. Perhaps there is someone on the forum who has experience shipping TO China that might have better insight on exports.
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vambostrausser said Jan 16, 2014 18:25:54
Why bother sending stuff to China when you can buy these

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Import-Conversion-Posts-Install-ABR-1-Epiphone-other-import-guitars-Nickel-/111257775471?pt=Guitar_Accessories&hash=item19e77aed6f
THE CUSTOMER IS ALWAYS RIGHT,THE GIRL IS MUCH TOO YOUNG TO KNOW THE DIFFERENCE
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stanton.kramer said Jan 16, 2014 18:39:34
The conversion posts from Philadelphia Luthiers is probably a good option that was not available two months ago. They were "out of stock" and did not have an ETA beyond some time in the future. Had they had these (in gold) I might have opted for this to keep a more authentic look. But the roller bridge works great, though a bit more difficult to adjust.
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